Andy Murray explains what could make him stop playing tennis forever

ANDY MURRAY has struggled for consistency over the last couple of years.

Andy Murray believes the only thing that will force him into retirement is if the former British No 1 no longer sees any improvement in his game. But for now, Murray insists he is still gradually getting better and better as he seeks to climb the tennis rankings.

The 35-year-old has struggled for consistency since undergoing two major hip operations. Niggling injuries have forced him to sit out of a couple of Grand Slams over the past few years.

Murray crashed out of the second round at Wimbledon in June, losing to John Isner in four sets. He got the better of James Duckworth in another four-setter in the previous round.

Murray crashed out of the second round at Wimbledon in June, losing to John Isner in four sets. He got the better of James Duckworth in another four-setter in the previous round.

And after another defeat by Alexander Bublik in the Hall of Fame Open, Murray reiterated his desire to continue playing. The World No 52 insists he will quit once he no longer sees any improvement in his performances.

“(I want) to continue to improve. If I keep seeing progress I’ll continue to keep playing,” Murray said. It was a similar message to the one he echoed after his Wimbledon defeat. He told journalists that his future depends entirely on his fitness.

“It depends on how I am physically. If physically I feel good, then we’ll try to keep playing,” the two-times Wimbledon champion said at the All England Lawn Tennis Club. But it’s extremely difficult with the problems I’ve had with my body in the last few years to make long-term predictions about how I’m going to be even in a few weeks’ time, never mind in a year’s time.

“If physically I’m in a good place, yeah, I will continue to play. But it’s not easy to keep my body in optimal condition to compete at the highest level.”

A post-retirement world is looking bright for Murray whenever he chooses to hang up his racket. The Scot has spoken about pursuing coaching and recently named the players whose careers he would like to oversee.

But he has also insisted that he has other interests outside of tennis, telling the Telegraph ahead of Wimbledon: “I have interests and things outside of tennis and I know that when I finally finish, everything will be fine. The world won’t end. Whereas maybe when I was 25, and maybe at times even at the beginning of the documentary in 2017, I was still a bit like that.”

 

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